Wildlife Loss

Large Herbivore Effects on Tick and Tick-borne Disease in the Tehachapi Mountains, CA

Identifying and understanding synergies between multiple aspects of global change is a research and conservation priority. This challenge is addressed by exploring the interactive effects of climate change and faunal turnover on a critical ecosystem function, control of infectious disease. This study uses a large-scale field exclosure experiment, replicated across a strong regional climate gradient, to mechanistically examine the effects of large wildlife loss, and the addition of livestock, on tick abundance, prevalence of tick-borne disease, and disease risk, under a range of climatic conditions.

Ph.D. Candidate
(she/her/hers)
Community Ecology, Infectious Disease Ecology, Global Change Ecology
Ph.D. Student
(she/her/hers)
Infectious Disease Ecology, Population Ecology

Large Wildlife Alteration of Resources for Pollinators in the Tehachapi Mountains, CA. 

This project is exploring the interactive effects of faunal turnover (i.e. changes in species composition) and climate change on pollination, an ecosystem service critical for ecosystem stability, crop production, food security and human welfare. Questions include: how does large wildlife loss and associated replacement with livestock impact plant-pollinator interactions and pollination services? Does climate mediate these impacts? How do these disturbances influence floral abundance and floral resource quality, phenology, pollinator visitation rates, and seed set?

Ph.D. Candidate
(she/her/hers)
Community Ecology, Infectious Disease Ecology, Global Change Ecology

Large Wildlife Alteration of Resources for Pollinators in the Tehachapi Mountains, CA. 

This project is exploring the interactive effects of faunal turnover (i.e. changes in species composition) and climate change on pollination, an ecosystem service critical for ecosystem stability, crop production, food security and human welfare. Questions include: how does large wildlife loss and associated replacement with livestock impact plant-pollinator interactions and pollination services? Does climate mediate these impacts? How do these disturbances influence floral abundance and floral resource quality, phenology, pollinator visitation rates, and seed set?

Ph.D. Candidate
(she/her/hers)
Community Ecology, Infectious Disease Ecology, Global Change Ecology

Large Wildlife Loss on Metrics of Carbon Storage and Turnover on the Kenyan Savannah.

This project is interested in the indirect impacts of large native herbivore loss (and additionally, their replacement with domestic herbivores for grazing) on ecosystem carbon dynamics including soil carbon storage, soil microbial activity and biomass, soil carbon dioxide flux or emissions. The aim of this research is to demonstrate the interconnectedness of large wildlife species and the more invisible process of ecosystem carbon cycling and storage, and in doing so to demonstrate the pressing need to incorporate large-bodied organisms into calculations of landscape-scale carbon budgets, in light of simultaneously accelerating climate change and size-selective biodiversity loss worldwide. 

This work enables the opportunity for interdisciplinary connection between ecosystems and community ecologists; between ecologists and geographers, computer scientists, and engineers; and between ecologists and conservationists, social and political scientists, historians, and other researchers who study the connections between both a changing environment and a changing society.

Ph.D. Candidate
(she/her/hers)
Community Ecology, Soil Ecology, Global Change Ecology